[+] HIVTRUE OR FALSE

Test your knowledge with
these 4 questions.

Click true or false:

1. If you and your partner are both HIV-positive, you need to use condoms.

You're right. Each person's HIV may be different. If you don't use condoms, you can be infected by a different strain, and that strain could be harder to treat.

Sorry, that is actually true. Did you know that each person's HIV may be different? If you don't use condoms, you can be infected by a different strain, and that strain could be harder to treat.

2. You can get HIV from getting a tattoo or body piercing.

You're right. If the tools used for tattooing or piercing haven't been cleaned the right way (sterilized), you can get HIV as well as other infections like hepatitis B or hepatitis C.

Sorry, that is actually true. You CAN get HIV from tattoos or piercings if the tools used have not been cleaned or sterilized. You can also get other infections like hepatitis B or hepatitis C.

3. You should probably start HIV medicine before you feel sick.

You're right. HIV treatment may help keep your CD4+ T-cell count up and your viral load down. Work with your healthcare provider to find the right treatment.

Sorry, that is actually true. A large study done by the National Institutes of Health has proven that starting treatment early, while your CD4+ T-cell count is still high, can keep you healthy. And treatment is recommended for everyone with HIV—even if you don't feel sick. Talk to your healthcare provider about finding the right treatment for you.

4. You don't have to put up with side effects of a medication even if
your viral load and CD4+ T-cell count are good.

You're right. Your treatment may be working—helping to reduce your viral load and increase your CD4+ T-cell count—but that doesn't mean you have to put up with side effects that make it hard to take. Keep track of any side effects you experience and discuss them with your healthcare provider. Never stop taking your HIV medication without talking to your healthcare provider first.

Sorry, that is actually true. You don't have to put up with side effects from your HIV treatment. Keep track of any side effects and talk to your healthcare provider about them. Together you can talk about what to do.